Kvetch Overload

Written by Editor on . Posted in Advice Columns

Do you have a question for Rivkie? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Dear Rivkie,

 I have a friend, “Sara,” who is driving me crazy. We are both married, in our 30s, and have several children. Although we have a lot of fun together and socialize as families quite often, she has a habit of complaining about her life in a way that I find excessive. She complains she is overweight (she’s not), her kids are difficult (they’re not), her house is too small (it’s not), etc. How do I respond when she says these things? I want to be a good, empathetic friend, but this drives me nuts. Please help!

A Match Made in Heaven

Written by Laura Goldman on . Posted in Advice Columns

Parents and teachers — in Hebrew, the root word for both is the same: to enlighten. As parents, we fervently hope that our children’s teachers will seek out ways to enlighten our kids. In fact, we not only want them to enlighten their minds toward intellectual success, but we also want them to enlighten their hearts toward their world, G-d, and their internal selves.

Rabbi Yakov Horowitz: Providing Tools for Parents and Educators to Support At-Risk Youth

Written by Laura Goldman on . Posted in Advice Columns

Rabbi Horowitz will be in White Oak for Shabbat Nov. 3-4 and will speak Nov. 4 at 8:30 p.m.

Rabbi Yakov Horowitz was a rebbe for 15 years when he began to notice behavior patterns in his students. Educationally, the kids were fed up with learning Gemara and with rebbes. They didn’t enjoy it. They were taught by rote; not in a way they could actually learn. It was boring and antiquated. Further, they didn’t feel emotionally cared for. They were not noticed as individuals or viewed as worthwhile if they couldn’t learn. They were becoming disenfranchised, and worse, disinterested.

Fretting Over Family

Written by Editor on . Posted in Advice Columns

Have a question for Rivkie? 

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Dear Rivkie,

 I have a dilemma. I come from a family that ranges from Reform to yeshivish. My immediate family is Modern Orthodox, and we want to invite family members to Yom Tov meals, but we know that if we invite them, they will drive to us on the holiday. We want to share the beauty of these holidays with our whole family, but how can we knowingly cause them to drive on the holiday when we would never do so?

Seeking Inspiration Beyond the High of the High Holidays

Written by Editor on . Posted in Advice Columns

Have a question for Rivkie? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Dear Rivkie,

 On the one hand, I am relieved that all those three-day Yom Tovs are behind me, what with the cooking, cleaning, serving, and mandated family time. On the other hand, there are a lot of fun family and friend times that go with them, not to mention the spiritual elevation that accompanies Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, especially. I want to get back to my “normal” schedule (I am certainly looking forward to my kids finally getting back to school), without losing my sense of being immersed in Judaism and spirituality.

SAT or ACT: The Final Frontier

Written by Nikki Porcaro on . Posted in Advice Columns

ACT or SAT? It’s an important choice, and confusion often reigns. Standardized tests are by no means the be-all, end-all of the application process, especially as many schools value or are moving toward a more holistic evaluation model, but they can be a great opportunity to help students distinguish themselves. They can help students gain access to honors programs or attain scholarships, and can even allow students to place out of certain intro-level college courses.

Loving Ourselves

Written by Laura Goldman on . Posted in Advice Columns

Do you have a question or subject you want to see covered in our Parenting column? Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

We are currently in the throes of the High Holidays, the time of year set aside for self-introspection and a return to self and G-d. In doing my own preparations for the holidays, I was struck by the challenge of forgiving myself for the things I wished I had not done, and the things I wish I had, so that I could move forward in meaningfully changing my actions. I am not alone.

Forgiving What You Can’t Forget

Written by The Single on . Posted in Advice Columns

It’s that time of year in the Jewish community when forgiveness is on everyone’s lips. I don’t know if you remember “The Single” from the first issues of Kol HaBirah, but for a forgiveness-themed entry in the Dating section I thought it was time to sub in for my colleague as *dramatic reveal music*: